On Air Now
Real Estate Today
12:00pm - 2:00pm
Real Estate Today
Contact Me
 
Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
World News
Subscribe To This Feed

Several Injured When Air Canada Plane Skids off Runway

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (HALIFAX, Nova Scotia) -- Several people on board an Air Canada flight were injured Sunday when the plane experienced a hard landing at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport.

The plane incoming from Toronto skidded off the runway upon landing early Sunday local time, said airport spokesman Peter Spurway. He said the pilots were in control of the plane up until the hard landing.

Spurway said there was snow on the runway but it hadn't yet been determined if it was a factor in the hard landing. The airport also suffered a power interruption around the same time of the incident, but it was unclear if the two events were related.

As of 6:45 a.m. ET, 18 of the 23 transported to the hospital had been released, according to Air Canada.

The airport was closed to all air traffic for several hours before reopening.

 

Again, operations are resuming. Expect changes to flight schedules, please check ahead.

— Halifax Airport (@HfxStanfield) March 29, 2015



Royal Canadian Mounted Police said its General Investigation Section, along with the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, opened a joint investigation to determine if anything criminal occurred.

 


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Germanwings Crash Co-Pilot Seemed Like a 'Normal Guy,' Fellow Pilot Says

Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images(DÜSSELDORF, Germany) -- A German pilot who recently flew with the co-pilot accused by French prosecutors of deliberately crashing a Germanwings plane said he seemed like a "normal guy," and he "had plans for the future."

French prosecutors have said co-pilot Andreas Lubitz deliberately slammed the passenger plane into a mountain on Tuesday. Authorities have since said he hid evidence of an illness from his employers, including a sick note that was found torn up inside his apartment in Dusseldorf dated from the day of the crash.

Frank Woiton, a Germanwings pilot, told German TV station WDR that he saw nothing unusual about Lubitz when he flew with him less than a month ago.

"The impression that I got was that he was a normal guy," Woiton said. "He had plans for the future. He wanted to fly long distance flights for Lufthansa."

German State Prosecutor Christoph Kumpa said on Friday that "a torn-up current sick note ... valid for the day of the incident" had been found inside Lubitz's apartment in Dusseldorf, adding that it "would -- according to preliminary evaluation -- support the assumption that the [pilot] had concealed his illness towards his employer and his occupational environment."

Kumpa said the note found indicated Lubitz, 27, "was declared by a medical doctor unfit to work."

The disclosure of torn medical documents at the co-pilot's home came shortly before Germanwings' parent company, Lufthansa, announced that it would be changing company policy to require two "authorized persons" remain in the cockpit at all times during the flight, in light of the finding that Lubitz apparently stopped the captain from re-entering the cockpit and forced the plane to crash.

In addition to the findings suggesting Lubitz was hiding an illness, a search of his apartment in Dusseldorf yielded no suicide note and the city's prosecutor announced that there was no evidence that political or religious factors were involved in the crash.

The New York Times reported that Lubitz sought treatment for vision problems that may have put his future as a pilot at risk, two officials with knowledge of the investigation told the newspaper.

It's unclear how severe the eye problems were but one official with knowledge of the investigation hadn't ruled out that it was caused or enhanced by psychological factors, the Times reported.

ABC News was unable to independently confirm the report.

Dusseldorf University Hospital said Lubitz was a patient there and his last visit was two weeks before the crash. The hospital denied that the treatment was related to depression, but they have handed over all of his medical records to German investigators.

During a news conference on Thursday, the Lufthansa CEO said that Lubitz had undergone a medical examination that included a psychological evaluation before being hired in 2013 but, unlike physicals, mental evaluations are not required annually.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Amanda Knox 'Grateful' Conviction Overturned

ABC News(SEATTLE) -- After Italy's highest court decided to overturn Amanda Knox's reconviction in connection with her roommate's slaying, Knox said late Friday she was still processing the court's decision.

"I just wanted to say that I am incredibly grateful for what has happened, for the justice I've received, for the support that I've had from everyone," Knox told reporters. "What comes to mind is my gratitude for that life that has been given to me."

Knox, 27, was initially convicted by an Italian court of killing British student Meredith Kercher in 2007, but that decision was overturned on appeal in October 2011 after she had spent four years in prison.

She was then reconvicted last year and an appeal of the reconviction began this month. There is no possibility of any further appeals after Friday’s ruling.

"Meredith was my friend and she deserved so much in this life," Knox told reporters.

Knox has rebuilt her life in her hometown of Seattle, writing freelance theater reviews for a local paper and working at a bookstore. In February, her family said that she was engaged to Colin Sutherland, a friend whom she has known since middle school.

Her ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito faced the same appeal and was also annulled. While he has been present in the Rome court throughout the week, Knox has remained in America.

"I will never go willingly back," she told ABC News in January 2014.


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

6.0-Magnitude Earthquake Rocks Northern Chile

Tomislav Zivkovic/iStock/Thinkstock(SANTIAGO, Chile) – Parts of Northern Chile were rocked by a 6.0-magnitude earthquake on Saturday.

The quake struck 25 miles northeast of Calama at 12:35 p.m. local time, near Chile’s border with Bolivia, according to the United States Geological Survey. It had a depth of just over 65 miles.

So far, there have been reports of injuries or damage as a result of the quake.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

British Police Taser Knife-wielding Robber in Harrowing Surveillance Video

Wiltshire Police(WILTSHIRE, England) -- Harrowing surveillance video shows police tasering a knife-wielding man as he tried to rob a British supermarket.

Wiltshire Police released the video Friday, the same day they said James Lewis was sentenced to three years in prison. Police said he pleaded guilty to attempted armed robbery on Tuesday.

In the video from Feb. 1, a man identified by police as Lewis enters the supermarket wielding a large knife. He quickly heads toward the cashier and tries grabbing him.

The cashier manages to avoid his grasp and runs away when he jumps over the counter.

Officers arrive at the same time as Lewis, 22, because his father had called them saying he was concerned about his son, police said.

Lewis turns his knife on the officers trying to apprehend him, the video shows. One of the officers uses a shopping basket as a shield.

An officer then enters the supermarket and tasers Lewis, who falls to the floor, drops the knife, and grabs his head in agony. Police said he had refused to drop the knife when told to do so.

"Wiltshire police are very proud of all our officers, doing their part to protect the public," read a statement from police.


Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Deadly Hotel Siege Ends in Somalia

alexis84/iStock/Thinkstock(MOGADISHU, Somalia) -- A deadly attack at a hotel in Somali’s capital has ended after 12 hours.

Government officials said on Saturday they have taken back control of the hotel where gunman were held up for more than 12 hours in an attack that left at least 17 people dead.

The government had occupied the third and fourth floors of the hotel.

The terror group Al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the attack.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Amanda Knox's Conviction Overturned by Italy's Highest Court

ABC(ROME) -- Italy's highest court decided Friday to overturn Amanda Knox's reconviction in connection with her roommate's slaying, meaning that she will not be sent back to prison.

Knox's mother confirmed to ABC News that her daughter's conviction has been annulled.

Knox was initially convicted by an Italian court of killing British student Meredith Kercher in 2007, but that decision was overturned on appeal in October 2011 after she had spent four years in prison.

She was then reconvicted last year and an appeal of the reconviction began this month. There is no possibility of further appeals after Friday’s ruling.

Knox said in a statement that she is "tremendously relieved and grateful for the deicison of the Supreme Court of Italy."

"The knowledge of my innocence has given me strength in the darkest times of this ordeal," Knox says. Her family also released a statement saying they were "thrilled with" and "grateful for" Friday's decision.

"This is a big mistake that has to be rectified," Knox's defense attorney Carlo Dalla Vedova told ABC News before this latest appeal case began. "It has been done before."

Knox has previously told ABC News that while she maintains her innocence, she will not be traveling to Italy for the new appeal because if found guilty, she would then be sent back to jail for up to 28 years.

"I did not expect this to happen," Knox told ABC News in January 2014. "I really expected so much better from the Italian justice system. They found me innocent once before."

Knox has rebuilt her life in her hometown of Seattle, writing freelance theater reviews for a local paper and working at a bookstore. In February, her family confirmed that she is now engaged to Colin Sutherland, a friend whom she has known since middle school.

Her ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito is facing the same appeal and while he has been present in the Rome court throughout the week, Knox has remained in America.

"I will never go willingly back," she said in January 2014.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Germanwings Co-Pilot Andreas Lubitz Never Submitted Sick Note, Airline Says

Getty Images(DÜSSELDORF, Germany) -- The airline whose plane crashed in the French Alps never received the sick note that investigators found torn up in the apartment of the co-pilot who allegedly hid an illness from his employers before allegedly causing the fatal crash, it was revealed Friday.

Germanwings said in a statement Friday that they never received a sick note for co-pilot Andreas Lubitz that the senior prosecutor in Dusseldorf announced they had found torn up in his apartment.

Prosecutor Christoph Kumpa had said earlier in the day that "a torn-up current sick note ... valid for the day of the incident" had been found, adding that it "would -- according to preliminary evaluation -- support the assumption that the [pilot] had concealed his illness towards his employer and his occupational environment."

Kumpa said the note found indicated the pilot deemed unwell by a medical doctor.

The disclosure of torn medical documents at the co-pilot's home came shortly before Germanwings' parent company, Lufthansa, announced that it would be changing company policy to require two "authorized persons" remain in the cockpit at all times during the flight, in light of the finding that co-pilot Andreas Lubitz apparently stopped the captain from re-entering the cockpit and forced the plane to crash.

In addition to the findings suggesting Lubitz was hiding an illness, a search of his apartment in Dusseldorf yielded no suicide note and the city's prosecutor announced that there is no evidence that political or religious factors were involved in the crash.

The Wall Street Journal cited a friend of Lubitz who said that he suffered from depression and was worried that his employer would find out about his diagnosis. ABC News has not independently confirmed this account.

Dusseldorf University Hospital confirmed Lubitz was a patient there and his last visit was two weeks before the crash. They denied that the treatment was related to depression, but they have handed over all of his medical records to German investigators.

During a news conference on Thursday, the Lufthansa CEO said that the 27-year-old co-pilot had undergone a medical examination that included a psychological evaluation before being hired in 2013 but, unlike physicals, mental evaluations are not required annually.

The Germanwings plane crashed this past Tuesday in the Alps in southern France with 150 people on board, including two babies, the airline said. French President Francois Hollande said there were "apparently no survivors."

Brice Robin, public prosecutor of Marseille, France, said in a news conference Thursday that Lubitz appeared to want to "destroy the plane," purposefully locking the captain out of the Airbus A320's cockpit and accelerating the descent manually.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

US Helicopter Recovers Pair of Saudi Pilots After Fighter Jet Crash

Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(DJIBOUTI) -- A U.S. helicopter recovered a pair of Saudi pilots whose fighter jet had crashed in the Gulf of Aden on Friday.

A U.S. official confirmed that the Saudi plane, a F-15, had gone down due to mechanical issues while participating in Saudi airstrikes within Yemen. A U.S. Air Force HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter based in nearby Djibouti was set to rescue the pilots, who had ejected into the water.

The U.S. is not taking part in the Saudi-led campaign in Yemen, but is providing logistical and intelligence support.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

US Embassy in Iraq Denies Reports of Coalition Airstrike Mistakenly Hitting Iraqi Troops

Marcio Silva/iStock/Thinkstock(BAGHDAD) -- The U.S. embassy in Iraq on Friday denied Iraqi media reports that a coalition airstrike mistakenly struck Iraqi troops in Tikrit.

"We are aware of Iraqi media reports of casualties among Iraqi Security Forces in the vicinity of Tikrit University this morning," the embassy's statement reads. "No coalition airstrikes took place during the time or in the vicinity of these alleged casualties."

The embassy referred further questions to the Iraqi Ministry of Defense.

U.S. and coalition forces had begun to conduct airstrikes and offer additional support in the vicinity of Tikrit as Iraqi Security Forces attempt to retake the city from ISIS militants.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

European Aviation Regulator, Lufthansa Look into Two-Person Rule for Cockpits

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In the wake of the Germanwings plane crash earlier this week, both the European Aviation Safety Agency and Lufthansa are looking into mandating two people be in a plane's cockpit at all times.

The Germanwings plane crashed Tuesday in the Alps in southern France with 150 people on board, including two babies, the airline said. French President Francois Hollande said there were "apparently no survivors."

Brice Robin, public prosecutor of Marseille, France, said in a news conference Thursday that Lubitz appeared to want to "destroy the plane," purposefully locking the captain out of the Airbus A320's cockpit and accelerating the descent manually.

The EASA said in a press release Friday that it would make a temporary recommendation for airlines to ensure that two crew members -- including at least one qualified pilot -- are in the cockpit at all times.

In the Germanwings crash, one pilot had reportedly left the cockpit to use the restroom, and Lubitz was left alone.

EASA Executive Director Patrick Ky said that "while we are still mourning the victims, all our efforts focus on improving the safety and security of passengers and crews."

While the EASA makes that recommendation, individual states will still have to require their airlines to follow the two-person protocol.

German airliner group Lufthansa released a statement on Friday saying that its group member airlines would adopt the "rule of two." The move is termed a "precautionary measure."

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Germanwings Co-Pilot May Have Had Hidden Illness; No Suicide Note Found

Adam Berry/Getty Images(DÜSSELDORF, Germany) — There are indications that the co-pilot of the Germanwings aircraft that crashed into the French Alps Tuesday hid an illness from his employers, German prosecutors said in a statement Friday morning.

The disclosure of torn medical documents at the co-pilot's home came shortly before Germanwings' parent company, Lufthansa, announced that it would be changing company policy to require two "authorized persons" remain in the cockpit at all times during the flight, in light of the finding that co-pilot Andreas Lubitz apparently stopped the captain from re-entering the cockpit and forced the plane to crash.

Dusseldorf prosecutor Christoph Kumpa said on Friday that a letter found in a wastebasket in Lubitz' apartment indicated that a doctor had declared him unwell.

In addition to the findings suggesting Lubitz was hiding an illness, a search of his apartment in Dusseldorf yielded no suicide note and the city's prosecutor announced that there is no evidence that political or religious factors were involved in the crash.

During a press conference Thursday, the Lufthansa CEO said that the 27-year-old co-pilot had undergone a medical examination that included a psychological evaluation before being hired in 2013 but, unlike physicals, mental evaluations are not required annually.

The Germanwings plane crashed Tuesday in the Alps in southern France with 150 people on board, including two babies, the airline said. French President Francois Hollande said there were "apparently no survivors."

Brice Robin, public prosecutor of Marseille, France, said in a news conference Thursday that Lubitz appeared to want to "destroy the plane," purposefully locking the captain out of the Airbus A320's cockpit and accelerating the descent manually.


World News Videos | US News Videos

Follow @ABCNewsRadio

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Duchess Kate Middleton Makes Last Public Appearance Before Maternity Leave

Chris Jackson - WPA Pool/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Duchess Kate Middleton stepped out in a hot pink coat Friday at what could be her final public appearance before she gives birth to her second child, which is due next month.

The duchess, 33, was joined by her husband, Prince William, 32, at three engagements to support opportunities for young people in South London.

While touring the Stephen Lawrence Centre, a community and social research center, William reportedly told well-wishers it would be "not long now" before the birth of the couple’s second child, reports the U.K.’s The Telegraph.

The Telegraph also reported that the Duke of Cambridge, as William is formally known, described becoming a father a second time as a “game-changer” and said he could not wait for the birth.

"William said he couldn't wait for the baby to be born - he said he wanted it now, he couldn't wait another minute,” bystander Parl Reardon recounted to The Telegraph.

Kate is due in April but neither her exact due date nor the sex of the baby are publicly known.

The couple’s first child, son Prince George, will turn 2-years-old in August.

William and Kate on Friday also visited Christ Church in Gipsy Hill where they watched a performance by young people from XLP Arts Project, a charity for kids from inner London boroughs.

The royals also visited an XLP community bus and mobile recording studio that was converted from an old police riot van through MTV's Pimp My Ride TV show.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

People Flock to See Jesus' Face on Hillside in Colombia

iStock/Thinkstock(BOGOTA, Colombia) -- Many say you can see the face of Jesus in nature, but locals in a small town in Colombia are claiming that literally.

Both the faithful and opportunistic are flocking to see what they claim is an image of Jesus' face in a hillside in the town of San Francisco in the Colombian province of Putumayo, according to the Colombian newspaper El Tiempo.

The site is in southern Colombia, close to the border with Ecuador.

The formation was discovered after a small landslide in the ravine.

"If you believe in Jesus you will see your image," Ximena Rosero Arango, a visitor to the site, told El Tiempo, according to a translation by Discovery.com.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

In Joseph Kony Hunt, US Courts Defectors with Pop Music

STUART PRICE/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Three and a half years after President Obama sent 100 special operations troops to Africa to help root out Lord’s Resistance Army leader Joseph Kony -- so far unsuccessfully -- the broader U.S.-supported international anti-LRA team has resorted to using a truly unstoppable force against the alleged war criminal: pop music.

Blasted over helicopter loudspeakers buzzing over the jungle and often on the radio, the song “Come Home” by popular Ugandan pop star Chameleone urges Kony’s followers to turn their back on the purportedly crazed leader. Chameleone composed the song in 2013 at the behest of U.S. embassy officers who were looking for innovative ways to reach would-be defectors, according to Marty Regan, a field representative for the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations in Uganda.

Chameleone told ABC News he wrote the song to try and “cajole” Kony, who he says is a fan, “out of the bush.” In the song, he urges LRA members, “Your mother, father and family are waiting for you…do not suffer out there thinking nobody cares about you…I am simply waiting for my brothers in the LRA to come home. You are forgiven.” 

Regan echoed the song’s sentiments: “The message that it conveys is this: you were abducted, this is not your fault, this is your land, and you are welcome back here.”

The pop music initiative is part of a concentrated effort between the U.S. and its partners to reach out to local communities and develop reintegration programs for defectors. In addition to playing “Come Home” on the radio and over the helicopter loudspeakers, the program uses radio interviews, thousands of air-dropped leaflets and posters to reach out to communities.

The public relations effort, coupled with increased military pressure against the LRA forces, is what Regan attributes to a drastic decrease in LRA numbers. According to Regan, the LRA force is thought to be down to around 150 members, a far cry from the thousand militants it used to command in 2009.

Although the LRA is now in what Regan deemed “survival mode,” resorting to banditry and looting rather than mass abductions and murders, the memories of the atrocities the LRA committed is enough to strike fear in the local communities.

“It has not been long since they were a horrible force there,” said Regan. “As long as Joseph Kony is at large, while their ability to reconstitute themselves is questionable, the fact that he’s still out there is of concern.”

The State Department says that as the LRA’s leader, Kony is wanted for “among other acts, forced enlistment of children as soldiers through abduction, sexual enslavement, and intentionally directing attacks against civilian populations.” An INTERPOL Red Notice says Kony has been charged with 12 counts of “crimes against humanity” and another 21 “war crimes.”

Speaking in 2012 about his decision the previous October to send the 100 U.S. “advisors” after Kony, Obama told ABC News, “None of these decisions are easy, but those who are familiar with the Lord’s Resistance Army and their leader, Mr. Kony, know that these are some of the most vicious killers.”

“They terrorize villages. They take children into custody and turn them into child soldiers. They engage in rape and slaughter in villages they go through. They have been the scourge on the Uganda and that entire region, East Africa,” Obama said then.

The State Department’s use of pop music against the terror group was reported in the organization’s regular State Magazine. Regan is quoted in an article there as saying that despite the atrocities the LRA has committed, most defectors seem surprisingly “normal.”

“I have met with a number of LRA defectors. When you meet them, you are almost taken aback by how ‘normal’ they appear,” Regan said. “They appear to be humble, regular people. While you can sympathize with all of them who ended up in the LRA after being abducted at a young age, many of the defectors were long time fighters who murdered, mutilated and raped innocent people.”

The magazine said that 250 LRA members are believed to have defected since 2012. A State Department fact sheet put out the same year said that since the year 2000, more than 12,000 “former LRA fighters and abductees” have left the group and have been reintegrated through a local amnesty program.

Millions of Americans first heard about Kony and his group’s purported atrocities when a 30-minute web video called “Kony 2012” went viral that year. As of this publication, the video has over 100 million views.

The U.S. government is offering $5 million for information leading to Kony’s arrest or conviction.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



SnoCountry

Weather

 




On Facebook



WADK celebrates Newport's 375th

LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services